Banned Book Week, review 1: Night by Elie Wiesel

 Summary: Night by Elie Wiesel is a memoir about his experience in the Nazi German concentration camps at Auschwitz and Buchenwald in 1944–1945, toward the end of the Second World War. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.


~ Night is on the ACLU's list of bannned and challenged books for the year 2001-2002

~It was challenged in Texas for profanity, violance and horror.

~As a result of challenge:, use of the book in the curriculum was restricted to select students.


Review:  Allow me to indulge in some profanity of my own. Although this is also a prayer.

Oh. My. God.  This is one of the most simply and gracefully written punches in the gut I've ever read.  And it rings completely true. Yes there is some profanity and violence. Yes, it's horrifying. But we're talking about the HOLOCAUST here, one of the most horrifying events in human history.

People need to know about this. They need to know what humans are capable of, what can happen when fear and ignorance and injustice rule a society.


My take: I call shenanigans on banning this book. There is nothing gratuitous or inappropriate about it, only heartbreaking, difficult truth.

Have you read it? What's your take?

7 comments:

  1. I haven't read it yet. It's on my to-read list!

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  2. One of the most powerfully written books ever.

    To ban this book is like trying to ban truth.

    I read it his year and it changed me.
    http://theerraticmuse.blogspot.com/2010/07/night-elie-wiesel.html

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  3. Laura- You should read it, it doesn't take long to read. Of course, processing is a different story...

    Miss Pickwickian- I agree. :) Headed over to read your review now!

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  4. I taught this book in high school. It read the most looked forward to book of all--kids would hear about it from other kids and want to read.

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  5. I haven't read this, but life is sometimes painful and frightening and horrific, and these truths shouldn't be denied to the students, somehow sugarcoating history. I say, lift the ban.

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  6. Beth- That's really amazing! I'm not really surprised though, since I was hooked from the first page...

    Joanne- I think that what you say about not sugercoating history is really important. We have to know that such things are possible. In fact that's a theme in the first part of the book, people thinking "Surely things like that don't really happen. Not here, not in this century." And then they do. :(

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  7. where was it banned?

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